Author Topic: Making Wine from Jelly  (Read 417 times)

Starlady

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Making Wine from Jelly
« on: February 10, 2019, 08:01:53 PM »
This is my 1st attempt at any wine and since I had so much elderberry jelly left over from 2 years ago AND it was still good, I decided to try it.  Some fruit jelly (any melon in my experience) doesn't keep well for more than a year, so you'll have to pop a jar or two to be sure it's OK.  If it's even slightly off, so will be your wine.   I followed this recipe pretty closely, my changes are in caps, I waited till 90 days to add the extra pectic enzyme that was needed (because I wasn't paying attention & it was Christmas, lol) and I did NOT use any sulfites.

This makes a 3 gallon batch.  Next time, I'll use 2 more jars of jelly for a slightly fruitier tasting wine.

4 lbs (36 fl oz) any flavor jelly (6 PINT JARS)
sugar to bring s.g. to 1.090 (3 CUPS)
5 tsp powdered pectic enzyme
2-3 tsp citric acid * (2 TSP)
* This really depends on the jelly. Add 2 teaspoons for high acid fruit, 3 teaspoons for low acid fruit. Other considerations: add more tannin for tannin-neutral jellies, like peach or apple mint.

1/2 tsp powdered grape tannin
water to 1 gallon  (3 GALLONS)
1-1/4 tsp yeast nutrient  (1.75 TSP)
1 pkt general purpose wine yeast (I USED LALVIN EC-1118, IT'S A GENERAL)
You can match the wine yeast to the fruit, just as you would for the fresh fruit itself, or simply use a general purpose yeast you like.

READ THESE DIRECTIONS OVER SEVERAL TIMES, IT'S A BIT DIFFERENT IN THE BEGINNING FROM THE DEMO YELLOW ROSE DID LAST FALL SINCE YOU WILL BE TAKING 3 DAYS TO PREP THE JELLY, THEN YOU'LL ACTUALLY START MAKING WINE.

1.  Bring 3 quarts of water to boil, remove from heat and stir in all the jelly. Cover and set aside 4-5 hours (until room temperature). Transfer to primary, stir in pectic enzyme, cover primary, and set aside 3 days (72 hours)
2.  Transfer liquid back to pot and bring to a boil and hold boil for 5 minutes.  You'll have a gummy mess of pectin in the bottom of the jug - that's the 'jell' you took out, don't add it back.
3.  Put sugar, citric acid, powdered tannin, and yeast nutrient in primary.
4.  Pour liquid over dry ingredients in primary and stir until sugar is dissolved. Cover primary and set aside to cool to room temperature. At the same time, begin a yeast starter.
4a. When liquid is cool, check specific gravity and adjust to 1.095. Transfer to secondary but do not top up.
5.  Add activated yeast starter solution (I JUST ADDED THE PACKAGE & STIRRED WELL) and cover with paper towel held in place with a rubber band. After 3 days seal with airlock.
6.  When vigorous fermentation subsides (5-7 days), top up; this will reduce the alcohol level slightly to a more amenable 11.5-12%.
7.  Wait 30 days and rack, sulfite, top up, and reattach airlock. Rack every 30 days (sulfite every other racking) until no new sediment forms and wine is clear. If wine doesn't fall perfectly clear in 60 days, add another teaspoon of pectic enzyme and wait 2 weeks. If still not clear, add another teaspoon. [NOTE: Be sure pectic enzyme has been stored properly. If wine does not clear after adding 7 teaspoons, replace the pectic enzyme.] Stabilize, sweeten if desired, wait 30 days, and bottle. Might taste after 3 months, but really should wait 6 or longer.

I've been taste testing after each racking.  The 1st month tasted like pure alcohol and I was bitterly disappointed that maybe I'd watered it down too much.  It got incredibly better after each racking and the taste now is nearly perfect when I add a bit of sugar to the glass.  I prefer a sweet wine but when I bottle in another month or two, I'll probably leave 3-4 bottles dry and make the rest sweet.  Which you do by adding potassium sorbate to the batch, waiting a day, then add the sugar you want and bottle.  The PS kills any left over yeast so that it doesn't start fermenting again when you add the sugar ....which will pop your corks right out.

It's nothing like the homemade elderberry wine I had from relatives in Florida almost 40 years ago, that was more like a cordial and this recipe makes a nice, light wine.  I'm excited for it to be done and very pleased with it.  I can't wait to do more experiments!

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them." Albert Einstein

Fixit

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Re: Making Wine from Jelly
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2019, 01:40:14 PM »
Sounds nice. We have proven that wine can be made from just about anything . We have made it from lemon balm , likes  likes and sumac ,oranges ,and so many more things .

Starlady

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Re: Making Wine from Jelly
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2019, 11:42:22 PM »
I'm growing lemon balm for the 1st time this year, does the wine taste like lemon?
"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them." Albert Einstein

Fixit

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Re: Making Wine from Jelly
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2019, 01:27:43 PM »
Yes in a very light and mild way.

YellowRose

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Re: Making Wine from Jelly
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2019, 12:57:07 PM »
I love that you found a way to make it from jelly.  The thought had never occurred to me.  I am glad it is turning out.  Letting it sit longer does make a big difference.