Author Topic: Camping Stove Failure  (Read 872 times)

Searchboss

Camping Stove Failure
« on: May 15, 2023, 12:36:51 PM »
I thought I would share a story about a problem I encountered on my latest campout. When I started camping many years ago, I started out using a single-burner Coleman liquid gas stove (similar to this one: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-3000000792-Dual-Fuel-Stove/dp/B00069QI8I/ref=sr_1_10?keywords=coleman+one+burner+stove&qid=1684158335&sr=8-10) although mine is not dual fuel.
 
As the family grew and we started cooking for more people, I started using a two-burner Coleman liquid gas stove that my father passed down to me (similar to this one: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Burner-Compact-Liquid-Stove/dp/B0009PUPX8/ref=sr_1_14?crid=2QJYQCNTG99ZC&keywords=coleman+two+burner+stove&qid=1684158558&sprefix=coleman+two+burner+stove%2Caps%2C130&sr=8-14) although mine is not dual fuel. I have been using this stove for over 20 years. I also have some gas lanterns that work similarly and use the same fuel.

These are great stoves, but are a bit finicky to use. Unfortunately, the pump assembly that pressurizes the fuel tank on the two burner stove disintegrated about a year ago and I had to replace the entire pump mechanism with a new one. (https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Universal-Plunger-Metal-Part/dp/B07YGSHC8Q/ref=sr_1_3?crid=JHV2KMUT9LJF&keywords=coleman+liquid+gas+stove+pump&qid=1684161789&sprefix=coleman+liquid+gas+stove+pump%2Caps%2C107&sr=8-3)
 

The replacement worked, but after a year it failed on a campout to south Georgia. Fortunately, I had a backup stove on that trip, (you know, the two is one and one is none rule) so we used the one burner stove for the rest of the trip. It took more time to cook everything, but it worked.

When I got home I took the pump assembly apart, inspected everything, lubricated it, and reassembled it. I saw nothing wrong with it. When I tested it at home, it worked fine. About a month later I used the stove at a cookout just to confirm it worked, again with no problems. The weekend before the SEPN Spring Campout this month I got the stove out, set it up and lit both burners just to make sure that the stove worked like it should. Then I took it to the campout. I could not pump the tank up again! No matter what I did the pump assembly simply would not pressurize the tank, even after I took it apart and reinstalled it twice. We went back to using the one burner stove again.

Since the stove's last failure, I have decided to replace the old two-burner liquid gas stove with a new Coleman two-burner LP gas stove that can run on a one pound LP tank or a 20 pound LP tank like what you have on typical gas grills. https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-Triton-2-Burner-Propane-Camping/dp/B09HN1C1YJ/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2QJYQCNTG99ZC&keywords=coleman%2Btwo%2Bburner%2Bstove&qid=1684158558&sprefix=coleman%2Btwo%2Bburner%2Bstove%2Caps%2C130&sr=8-1&th=1

1 lb. tank: https://www.amazon.com/Propane-Fuel-Tank-Pk-Coleman/dp/B003VCPGHG/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=coleman+1+lb+propane+tank&qid=1684167821&refinements=p_89%3AColeman&rnid=2528832011&s=sporting-goods&sprefix=coleman+1+lb+%2Caps%2C142&sr=1-2

20 lb. tank: https://www.amazon.com/New-Steel-Propane-Cylinder-Valve/dp/B01E2TMS5E/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=20+lb+propane+tank&qid=1684167943&sr=8-3
   
There are many reasons I decided to make this change, but the main factors were standardization and ease of use [I hope, since I have not used the new stove yet]. There are simply fewer moving parts on the new stove and fuel setup. A second reason is the fact that you can buy single burner stoves, lanterns, and run heaters like a Buddy Heater, all on the same 1 and 20 pound fuel tanks. These fuel tanks are relatively inexpensive and readily available at most Walmart, Academy, and various camping equipment stores and at many commercial campgrounds.

At some point, I will probably replace the pump assembly on my old liquid gas stove again just so I can get it to work again, but I have lost confidence in the stove being reliable like it used to be.

Despite the failure, we had a great time at the campout. I look forward to using the new stove at the next one!

RWS

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Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2023, 01:59:53 PM »
On the older Coleman pump up gas stoves, when the pump fails, pull it out of the tube and lubricate the leather (Rubber) diaphram.  It dries up from non use.  I just pull the dip stick on my vehicle and get a dab of oil, rub it in.  I have replaced the diaphram with a piece of leather from an old shoe.  What I like about those old stoves is they are repairable------in the field.

nj_m715

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2023, 02:44:00 PM »
not really a problem for GA, but LP likes to freeze up in cold weather

with that said, I carry a LP stove
if it's that cold I'm not going camping
if I'm forced to camp in the cold, I can cook in the truck / tent

Searchboss

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2023, 02:48:55 PM »
RWS, Unfortunately, the original leather cup disintegrated a few years ago. The replacement that Coleman sent was some form of rubber or silicone. At the time I could not find a leather replacement. I truly think that may be the problem. When I looked this week I did see some out there, but did not check the specifications to see if they will fit the stove I have which is over 30 years old. I plan to look into that when I can.

nj_m715, thanks for the tip. I agree with you about camping in the cold!

Searchboss

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2023, 06:04:27 PM »
I bought the Coleman Triton Propane 2-Burner Stove. It was relatively inexpensive and the 1 lb. fuel canisters are widely available at most sporting goods stores, Walmart, and camping stores. I bought several so I have spares, plus I bought a propane refill adapter so I can refill the 1 lb. fuel canisters. I also bought an adapter hose so I can run the stove on a 20 lb. LP gas tank that you see on most gas grills. This gives me a lot of options.

I took it out to the backyard and tried it out today. It works as advertised. The only complaint was the flame is a bit hard to see. I am looking forward to the next campout so I can try the new stove out. I am sure there will be a learning curve while figuring out how to cook on this stove as compared to the old one.

Surveyor1

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2023, 09:17:09 AM »
We bought a “propane tree” for our 20 lb tank.  It has 3 outlets so you can use 3 different appliances.  The 1st outlet is on top which we put a lantern on and the other 2 are on the trunk that you can run a hose to other propane items.  Really works well in an outdoor kitchen and you don’t have the hassle of changing out the smaller tanks in the middle of cooking.  See link below.

https://www.amazon.com/propane-tree/s?k=propane+tree
Give a man a fish and feed him a day teach him how to fish and you have a friend for life.

Searchboss

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2023, 09:53:08 AM »
I have four liquid gas lanterns which work well putting out a lot of light and also double as a great heater in winter. Sadly, I have not used any of them in over 5 years since I started using battery-operated LED lights which are smaller, easier to use, and put out just as much light. I will have to use the new propane stove for a season and then revisit the idea of getting a "propane tree". I like the options it provides but really don't want to have to lug around a 20 lb. propane tank just to cook. I think it would work well for a winter campout where I could use a "Buddy Heater" along with a stove attached to the propane tank. Thanks for the tip!

Searchboss

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2023, 01:02:57 PM »
Surveyor1, I forgot to ask, how long does a 20 lb. LP gas tank last running your stove and lantern, etc?

Surveyor1

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2023, 01:18:28 PM »
Surveyor1, I forgot to ask, how long does a 20 lb. LP gas tank last running your stove and lantern, etc?

Never checked but have camped for a week and the tank felt basically the same weight as when we got there.  If I had to guess I would say a few weeks at least?  I guess you could see how long a one LB tank you can cook with and multiply.  The lantern uses very little.  It’s a lot cheaper (after the initial investment) than the 1 LB cylinders are.  We’ve had out tree and hoses for over 25 years and never a problem.  Usually we would hook up the lantern, 2 burner stove and a table top grill.  I haven’t priced the 1 LB cylinders lately but it cost just a touch over $15.00 to have my 20 LB filled up at my gas store. 
Give a man a fish and feed him a day teach him how to fish and you have a friend for life.

nj_m715

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2023, 03:31:38 PM »
dont buy green cans, refill them

I just replaced my 10-20yo collection of 1lb bottles. I finally wore out the valves and they were leaking
a few of them were 30yrs old.
when one starts to leak I screw it onto a torch and mark it as bad
the torch seals the leak so I just use it as normal then throw it out when its empty again

I don't vent when refilling so I only get about 1/3 to 1/2 of a refill
I mostly use them for plumbing torches and camp stove so 1/3 is plenty for me
it wouldn't be good for something like a buddy heater, they would use it too fast

I have a bunch of green bottles. I toss empties into a pile and refill them all at once

https://www.amazon.com/Gogoonike-Propane-Cylinder-Throwaway-Disposable/dp/B09V2G69RW


Abigayle

Re: Camping Stove Failure
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2023, 10:00:34 AM »
Good information!  Thanks!
Ariel

 

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